Last edited by Kilrajas
Sunday, December 6, 2020 | History

3 edition of How to talk to your teenager about drinking and driving found in the catalog.

How to talk to your teenager about drinking and driving

United States. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

How to talk to your teenager about drinking and driving

  • 278 Want to read
  • 13 Currently reading

Published by The Administration in Washington .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Youth -- Alcohol use,
  • Drinking and traffic accidents

  • Edition Notes

    StatementU.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration ; in cooperation with the National Congress of Parents and Teachers.
    ContributionsNational Congress of Parents and Teachers.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination[16] p. ;
    Number of Pages16
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14488901M
    OCLC/WorldCa2410489


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How to talk to your teenager about drinking and driving by United States. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Download PDF EPUB FB2

Possibly, the most important thing you can tell your child is it’s always okay for them to call you for a ride – whether they’ve been drinking or a friend they rode with was drinking. Explain to them they won’t get in trouble if they call, and that no matter the circumstance you will come to pick them up.

Have a Designated Curfew. Talking to your teenager about drinking and driving. Rockville, Md.: U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Administration, (OCoLC)   If your teen is interested in drinking, ask why.

Debunk myths. Teens often think that drinking makes them popular or happy. Explain that alcohol can make you feel "high," but it's a depressant that can also cause sadness and anger.

Discuss reasons not to drink. Explain the risks of teen drinking, and appeal to your teen's self-respect. Just like so many other topics, finding the right way to talk with your teen about drunk driving can be uncomfortable and difficult.

Parents are the key to keeping teen Author: The News Wheel. information or statistics is enough to convince your teen not to drink alcohol. Teens believe, “Nothing bad will happen to me.” They assume negative things happen to others, not to them.

The Bottom Line Adults may hold beliefs and have thoughts that simply do not exist for teens. Help your teen. Drinking can be a hard subject to talk to your teen about because they most likely have different views on the subject than you, but it is crucial to know how to talk to your teen about drinking.

Based on what kids hear from their friends they usually think drinking increases their social status and makes them seem like an adult. Discuss, and agree upon, consequences. Involve your child in a conversation about what should happen if they do drink while underage, and what will happen as a result.

Be sure you can enforce these rules and that your child understands why you’ve set them. Help your child understand the legal implications. If you're talking to your kid about the important issues in life, the subject of alcohol is bound to come up.

In some ways, the "alcohol talk" is a lot like the "sex talk": Ideally, you'll have the discussion long before your child really needs it. Learning about alcohol at an early age can keep him or her from making mistakes and dealing with unpleasant consequences later on.

When talking to teens consider what your goal is — and hold that in mind. Stay calm. Once the alliance is ruptured, it’s difficult to have the impact needed to protect.

Many teenagers might not know how dangrous is driving after drinking. This book reminded me of many accident that happened in the news.

There are so many teenagers that over drink alcohol and cause problems. I highly recommend this book to parents and students that in high school or younger.

We all should realize how dangerous it could s: COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

Explain the consequences and dangers of drinking and driving. Stay involved in your teen’s life, activities, and form a network with the parents of their friends.

Make “House Rules” with tangible consequences for drinking and driving. Be a good example, by not drinking and driving yourself. However, if your teenager is drinking, you might want to establish some expectations. Some parents should consider creating ways for their teen driver to ask for help, even if they have been drinking.

This can help your teenager out of “peer pressure” situations they do not want to be in and can keep them from feeling as if they need to.

The best way to talk to your teenager about the dangers of drinking and driving is to begin an open dialogue. Talk to your teenager well before he or she starts driving and make sure he or she understands the dangers.

Give your teenager a chance to speak and express opinions. Make it more of a discussion as opposed to a lecture. Often, teens listen better to older teens than their own parents, so if you know an older teen who can be a positive influence on your teen, try that.

However, don't abdicate your responsibility to talk to your teen because your opinion does matter, and teens whose parents talk to them about drinking and driving are 42 percent less likely to do so. General advice for talking to your teen about drinking: Ask open ended questions. Control your emotions.

Show that you care and understand. Promote open communication. Discuss real-world consequences that teens can relate to. You may lose your place on the team or your scholarship. Talk about the consequences of drunk driving.

Perhaps a celebrity has recently been charged with drunk driving, or even a family member or friend. Ask what your teen thinks about the issue and then — listen. The most important thing you can do when talking to your teen about any difficult subject is to listen as much as you talk.

If you do all the talking, your teen will feel like he or. Information your teenagers need about drink driving Okay they don’t talk to strangers, they look before they cross the road and they know about safe sex.

Now your teenagers need to know Jun/ Infrastructure about drink driving. Peer Group Pressure Peer group pressure is very strong among teenagers. The need to be part of a group. Find some valued resource or freedom to temporarily deny that is not at the expense of the teenager's growth.

When grounding, do not cut off all social contact for your adolescent. It is a well-known fact that drinking and driving is the number one killer of teenagers in the nation. Cell phone usage while driving is running a close second, but drinking and driving is still the number one cause.

It is very important that you talk to your teenager about the dangers of drinking when driving. Parents need to talk to their teens and model safe driving behavior to help instill what it means to be a responsible driver. Share.

Recommended Posts. The Myth of Multi-Tasking and Why It’s Dangerous for Teen Drivers. J ‘Working Memory,’ Essential To Safe Driving, Linked To Teen Driving. If you are concerned that your child is drinking, you can address the problem in the following ways: You can talk to your teen about alcohol use and discuss the potential effects and dangers listed above.

You can monitor your teenager’s activities and restrict the teen from going places where alcohol is being served. It’s never easy talk to your teen about drinking and driving, but with summer here, it’s never been more necessary.

Because the summer months involve no school, a loose schedule, and a lot of hanging out with friends, your teen may be open to the idea of underage they are open to the idea of under age drinking, they could end up making the choice to drink and drive. Home» Talking to Your Teen about Drinking and Driving Making an impression about the effects of drinking and driving on your teen can be a challenge.

At this age, your teen may think that they know it all and are invincible to the dangers that are associated with it. If your teen is over the age of 13, you might be worried that you’ve missed your chance to talk about the dangers of drunk driving and alcohol use in general.

It’s never too late to talk to your teen about their health and well-being. If your teen comes home from a party and you smell alcohol on their breath or clothing, it is a sure sign they've been drinking. They may try to evade you or lie about why they smell like alcohol.

If your teen is stumbling, slurring their speech, or acting out of character, these are also signs that there has been alcohol or drug use. How to Talk to Your Children about Drinking and Driving Posted by Steven E.

Kellis on Febru One of the most exciting aspects of being a teenager in Pennsylvania is finally getting a. Consequences regarding impaired teen driving should be set, discussed, and enforced.

December is National Impaired Driving Prevention Month, so there’s no time like the present to talk to your teen about avoiding driving while under the influence of drugs or alcohol. DriveTeam offers an impaired driving course as part of our teen driving. Divide into small groups.

Anticipate the circumstances in which the next drunk-driving fatality involving a teenager might occur in your community. Then work out a strategy to prevent it from happening.

Compare your ideas with those of the other groups. Organize an anti-drunk-driving campaign for your school. Research shows that teens are less likely to drink if parents communicate they don’t want them drinking, don’t provide alcohol, and set rules and boundaries, as well as setting consequences if these are broken.

Dealing with a drunken teen. If your teen comes home intoxicated, you have a problem that needs to be dealt with quickly. Talking about the dangers of drinking isn’t enough; talk to your teen specifically about drinking and driving.

Provide Safe Alternatives – In an ideal world teens would never drink, but mistakes do happen and your teen needs a safe way to get home, even if. Talking to your teen about drunk driving isn’t easy, but think of it as a necessary evil.

Alcohol is the drug of choice among America’s youth, and kids are drinking at earlier ages than ever before. According to drunk driving statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, nearly one-fourth of teens surveyed admitted to.

The combination of autonomy and immaturity can lead to risky teen behaviors, like drinking, smoking, and having unprotected sex. You want your children to do the right things, but disciplining.

Which brings me back to my original point: it is more about equipping our children with rational sense and the consequences of drunk driving. Consistent communication. Just like the ‘Sex talk’, it is of paramount importance that education, awareness and communication regarding drunk driving or distracted driving happen consistently.

Teenagers drinking and driving is an unfortunate reality. There’s no reason pretending it doesn’t exist. Here are some depressing stats, but states you should know: 70% of all teenagers admit to drinking alcohol.

Every 15 minutes a teenager will die due to drunk driving. 60% of all teen deaths from car accidents involve alcohol. Preventing Teenage Drinking and Driving. Follow these tips to help prevent underage drinking and driving: Talk to your teen about the dangers of drinking.

Teens whose parents talk to them about the dangers of alcohol are far less likely to drink than teens whose parents don’t discuss the. Explore our list of Drinking and driving->Teen nonfiction Books at Barnes & Noble®. Receive FREE shipping with your Barnes & Noble Membership.

Our Stores Are Open Book Annex Membership Educators Gift Cards Stores & Events Help. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, most teens drink to get drunk. The organization’s website suggests that parents talk to.

Expect that there be children under 21 years old that are drinking and talk to your teen about the dangers of underage drinking and drunk driving. Let your teenager know your thoughts on the subject and remind him that underage drinking is illegal.

If he is caught drinking, he may face charges that will affect college decisions. If your teen sees you taking Driver’s Ed.

seriously, they are likely to as well. You should also learn about your state’s graduated driver licensing (GDL) laws. These laws can supplement any ground rules you’ve already set for your teen in regards to passengers, nighttime driving and cell phone use. Take Time To Drive With Your Teen. You know this, and keep your phone tucked away during every drive you take.

But you aren’t so sure that your child knows exactly why they shouldn’t text and drive. To explain the risks of texting and driving to your teen driver, you can start off by letting them the levels of distractions a cell phone can create.